January 29, 2012 8:03 pm - Published by

Bodykits, chrome and big wheels, all things that pop into people’s minds when you mention Saxos. However, to those in the know, there’s an underlying secret, one of a great handling, lightweight pocket rocket, something that the car in this feature embraces perfectly…

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Davo’s Saxo has been through a few changes, from a completely standard VTR, it was slammed to the floor on a set of Starmag wheels. His tastes changed though, the Starmags were sold, and a set of Speedline Corse 1721s were bought, looking somewhat reminiscent of Compomotive TH Monos, and with 20mm spacers, they sit beautifully on the car, a set of Gaz GHA 300lb coilovers up front, and ‘only’ Gaz GHA shocks on the back – the torsion beam, in this case with uprated 23mm torsion bars, meaning there’s no struts at the back – leave the arches hugging the wheels nicely. The suspension’s had a bit of consideration, and since the springs up front are what are considered stiff in the Saxo world, the front ARB has been removed. The rear ARB uprated to a 22mm VTS item to match the stiffer 23mm torsion bars, too.

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Engine wise, the car’s recently had a 16v engine from a Saxo VTS fitted, which, before it went in, was treated to a set of GMC’s ‘Ultimate road’ cams, I can confirm they are ultimate, and still unmapped, the car simply refuses to idle when cold. Why? Because race car, haha. A Green Cotton filter sucks the air in, where it flows through a Supersprint mid section, and out of a Kam Racing stainless back box, that looks very much the part!

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Power’s put down on the road by a set of Uniroyal Rainsport 2 tyres, joined to the aforementioned Speedline wheels. However, the party piece lies hidden inside the 106 GTi gearbox, the Quaife ATB diff allows power to be put down much earlier than in most FWD cars, and is very helpful on track at pulling the car out of corners quickly, and efficiently. And when it comes to stopping, a set of 266mm brakes (currently 283mm but in the process of being replaced), with grooved discs and Mintex 1144 pads give sufficient stopping power.

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The exterior still points references to it’s past, in the form of a smoothed boot trim, delocked doors, and deleted door badges. The headlights, fogs and side repeaters are all smoked, to give the car a moody look, which is also accenuated from the front by the addition of Aerocatches on the bonnet. A non-sunroof roof skin was found and fitted, eliminating some of the high up weight, and thus, lowering the centre of gravity.

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Moving onto the interior, the occupants are kept in place by a pair of Cobra Imola bucket seats, and Safety Devices/Schroth 3″ harnesses. In case of the worst happening, an OMP lightweight cage is welded in with extra bars, and A and B pillar gussets to protect both driver and passenger. A replica OMP Corsica wheel is connected to a slimline quick release boss to allow easy entry and exit for the driver, and a TRS helmet net holds the all important helmets safe in the back.

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After his first taste of track time, Davo’s working on perfecting the formula, as mentioned, the 283mm brakes are to be downsized to 266mm brakes, with better pads, fluid, and a set of cooling ducts, I believe he’s also working on getting a set of 106 Rallye steel wheels, wrapped in sticky Yokohama A048 rubber, to allow that Quiafe diff to work to it’s maximum potential.

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The trackday bug has well and truly stung again.


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